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If nobody comes up with a good explanation what makes the two tags different, we should merge (× 63) with (× 28), making the first (and more intuitive for new users) the master, and the second a synonym to it.

Note: Questions about this originate in the comments on Rename the 'firmware' tag to 'device-firmware' and make 'firmware' a synonym, where eldarerathis and I tried to untangle the mess with 'rom', 'stock-rom', 'device-firmware', and other tags, so one could catch some more background there.

And before somebody asks: yes, I know a stock-rom coming from e.g. Samsung is far from being vanilla. But what are people referring to when tagging a question 'stock-android' or 'vanilla-android'? The "least common denominator". Even questions explicitly tagged vanilla using the term "stock".

marked as duplicate by Flow Apr 4 '13 at 13:56

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    The previous Stock vs Vanilla discussion was here meta.android.stackexchange.com/questions/852 The consensus then was that they are different things (unless you have a Nexus). "Stock" is what your manufacturer has provided, "Vanilla" is AOSP. Opinions may have changed since then, so it could be worth a discussion – GAThrawn Apr 3 '13 at 15:03
  • Ah -- missed that (should have searched for the terms without their suffixes #/). Yepp, as I pointed out I'm aware of the difference (and make that clear in my books as well). But practice shows they are used synonymously by most users. I'm open to both ends -- we should chose what is the best for our site :) – Izzy Apr 3 '13 at 15:06
  • Marked as duplicate. If somebody want's to add new arguments or comments feel free to ask to re-open this Q by using a flag. – Flow Apr 4 '13 at 13:56

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