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Most devices from the same generation from the same manufacturer have very similar or even totally identical configuration, hardware or software. Solutions to problems for one device almost always appliesto others in the same series.

Let's say for example

  • Huawei Gxyz
  • Lenovo Axy0 (where x is a number and y is another, provided the x is the same number across the whole series)
  • LG G2 and G2 mini
  • OnePlus 3 and 3T
  • Samsung Galaxy S# and S# Active (where # is a number)

Also, things like don't seem to need existence. They can be merged into their "parent" tags (in this case, ).

Alternative solution: Leave these mess in their place. No one will care about this chaotic site.

P.S. What is ? Is it a typo? LOL.

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You claim that "devices from the same generation from the same manufacturer have very similar or even totally identical configuration". I checked the first specific example you gave, the LG G2 and G2 Mini, and they're not even based on the same SoC: the Mini has a Snapdragon 400 while the full-size one has a Snapdragon 800.

The real problem with the device-specific tags is that usually, people asking about a problem don't know whether the problem is device-specific or not. I think asking them to judge whether their phone is the same as one with a different name might be asking just a bit too much of them.

As for overly-specific tags like , they do no harm, and they enable someone to subscribe or ignore the tag if they're interested (or uninterested) in that specific thing. Tags that are actually unused (they are on one or zero questions) are removed automatically by the system.

P.S. That tag is a bit silly. Tags should describe what the question is about, not the question itself. If you can't imagine someone subscribing to that tag, it probably shouldn't exist.

  • I've removed that tag. – Matthew Read Jun 9 '17 at 18:50

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